How well do you know your nails?

How well do you know your nails? Believe it or not, your nails say a lot about your general state of health. They can tell when you are affected by disease or when you are malnourished. They signal you when you are having health problems or not taking care of them properly. Question is: Are you paying attention???

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, nail problems make 10 percent of all dermatological conditions. So, it is wise to closely evaluate the following when attending to your nails.

Appearance: Do well to always observe the color of your nails. Healthy nails should have consistent coloring and appear smooth. They shouldn’t be split or cracked especially in younger people. The skin around the edge shouldn’t appear puffy or swollen.

Texture: If you are not suffering from psoriasis and/or eczema, your nails should not be pitted. And unless you have been infected by fungi or bacteria, your nails should not be thickened with colors ranging from white, yellow, green to even black.

Do you have healthy nails?

With regards to topical applications, your nails may be the first to indicate the quality of products you may be using. Sometimes, just for fun, I observe peoples’ nail color and texture and later, I ask questions. 85 percent of the time, they are using unreliable products; Half of that time, they are not aware of the active ingredients in their body and/or hand creams, thereby causing damage to the skin and nails and the other half of the time, they trust unprofessional nail technicians who use nail polish, nail glue and nail polish removers made of really harsh chemicals OR are quite over-zealous with their manicure techniques.

The importance of nail care in relation to great health cannot be over emphasized. For some of us, beauty is all about what the eyes can see, which pushes a lot of women to cover up their un-healthy nails with polish or artificial nails. But in reality, beauty goes way deeper than that.

I like to believe that being beautiful is first, being healthy.

 

Have I left out a key point to knowing your nails better? Leave your ideas in the comment section below.

 

 

 

Skin Conditions 3

Psoriasis is a skin condition that so many people (1 in every 50 persons) are not aware they suffer from, especially dark-skinned persons.

Skin cells on the surface of the body usually get replaced about every 28 days by underlying cells. In people suffering from psoriasis, what would have taken 28 days happens in 4-6 days thereby, piling skin cells on the surface of the body. These skin cell piles cause thick red and purple patches in light and dark-skinned persons respectively. These patches which can be found on the scalp, face, elbows, knees, palms of the hand, soles of the feet and other parts of the leg, can get itchy and sore, sometimes they become scaly, swollen and painful.

Just like eczema, psoriasis has a genetic link to it, in other words, it can be hereditary. It can also be aggravated by stress, smoking, infection (misdirected immune intervention) and changes in the weather which may dry up the skin.

Psoriasis has no known cure but it can be managed quite well. It is not contagious!! It is not sexually transmitted and it is not as a result of poor personal hygiene!!

To properly manage this skin condition, the following should be considered;

  • Stop smoking!!! That is if you do smoke, of course. 😊
  • Supplement diet with vitamins A and D as these may be deficient in psoriatics. One can also consider sunshine or UV exposure. In moderation of course.
  • Essential fatty acids especially omega3 is vital.
  • It is important to regulate cells, repair the skins barrier and retain water, so using topical treatments with plant derivatives should prove effective. Aloe Vera, Curcumin (derived from turmeric) and Marigold extracts work well. Using moisturizers with these extracts as often as possible is a step in the right direction.
  • Work towards being stress-free.

It is wise to basically avoid any situation or environment that could trigger a psoriatic flare. If such measures have been taken yet reactions still persist, do well to consult a dermatologist for detailed examination.

Do you or anyone you know suffer from this skin condition? How do you (they) manage it?